Thyroid Cancer Is Not the Good Cancer

Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Is this on the rise because of a specific issue or from consistent check-ups? That part is still under research. It’s important to be aware of thyroid cancer even if you don’t have any thyroid problems. In fact, there are individuals who happen to notice a bulge in their neck, and when they go to the doctor, they get blood tests done. After the blood tests, their doctor often confirms their thyroid is functioning normal. Whether you have a current thyroid issue, or even if you never had a problem, it’s crucial to keep an eye on it.

How to Know if you Have Thyroid Cancer

Technically, the only way to find out if you have thyroid cancer is through a FNA biopsy. However, some symptoms often are a red flag for a FNA biopsy to be conducted.

• Hoarseness
• Sudden onset of coughing
• Difficulty breathing or swallowing
• Feeling a bulge in the neck area

What is a FNA Biopsy?
An FNA biopsy is used to determine if there is cancer inside the thyroid gland. Usually an FNA is ultrasound guided. What that means is that there will be an ultrasound done with a needle for the biopsy. This is so the doctor will know exactly where to place the needle, and to be sure he or she is in the right place. The doctor who is performing the FNA will numb you with Lidocaine in the spot he or she is going to enter with the needle. He or she will then enter your thyroid with the needle used for FNA’s. The needle is a bit different. It is specifically made to enter the thyroid nodule and be able to collect cells. The doctor will move the needle around and go back and forth with it, collecting the cells. Once he or she knows they have enough cells, they will send the cells off to pathology.

When you get the Results

Most often, you will have to wait on average a week. It depends on how backed up the pathology department is. It’s beneficial to ask while you are there what they think the time frame will be. Once the complete pathology is done, it will be sent over to your primary care physician’s office. He or she will call you with the results. You can also call them to see if they have received the results.

With thyroid cancer being on the rise, you should always keep your follow-up appointments. There are different kinds of thyroid cancer: Papillary Carcinoma, Medullary, Follicular, and Anaplastic. Treatment is usually easier with papillary carcinoma. While the others may be easy as well, it depends on the individual and the extent of the cancer. Keep an eye on your neck with thyroid cancer on the rise.

Underactive Thyroid Diet Plan – Foods That You Should Not Include in Your Hypothyroidism Diet!

If you suffer from an under active thyroid diet can play a major part in controlling your condition.

Coming up with an under active thyroid diet plan that suits you can be quite tricky. It is however imperative that you eat correctly and that you balance your diet properly.

When you are considering which foods to include it is well worth knowing which foods are known to be problematic for hypothyroidism sufferers and should definitely not be included in any hypothyroidism diet.


The first thing that anyone who seriously wants to formulate a hypothyroidism diet should do is to cut out alcohol. This is unpopular with many people but is, nonetheless, essential.

Alcohol can have a devastating effect on thyroid hormone levels and also prevent the thyroid from producing the hormone.

Anyone with hypothyroidism should ideally refrain from drinking alcohol completely. If you are unable to do this then consumption should be kept to a minimum.

Excess Fibre

Everyone needs fibre in their diet in order to remain healthy. If you are trying to put together an under active thyroid diet plan then you do, however, need to strictly control the amount of fibre you consume each day.

The ideal hypothyroidism diet, for older adults, should only include between 20 and 35 grams of fibre per day.

Sugary foods

Hypothyroidism often causes the body’s metabolic rate to decrease. This can cause you to put on weight.

The ideal hypothyroidism diet will contain no sugary foods at all. If you are unable to do this then you must at least reduce your intake of this type of food if your under active thyroid diet is going to have any chance of success.

Fatty Foods

Fatty foods can prevent, or at least interfere with, the thyroid and stop it from producing sufficient amounts of the thyroid hormone. A hypothyroidism diet should not include any fried foods at all and the intake of fats from other sources such as fat meat, margarine and butter should be dramatically reduced.

Cruciferous Vegetables

Vegetables such as cabbage, brussels sprouts, kale and broccoli can be instrumental in interfering with the thyroid’s ability to produce sufficient quantities of the thyroid hormone.

The problem can be significantly worse in people who suffer from an iodine deficiency.

Anyone on an under active thyroid diet should attempt to limit their intake of cruciferous vegetables to approximately five ounces per day.

The above shows only a small number of the foods that should not be included in any underactive thyroid diet plan. There are also a number of foods that must be included.

Curing an underactive thyroid naturally can be achieved but it is a matter of balancing a number of different elements. Adopting a properly constructed hypothyroidism diet will go a long way to helping a hypothyroidism sufferer get back to normal. It is however essential that you follow a proper hypothyroidism treatment program if you want to achieve success.

What Causes Hypothyroidism and Can It Be Cured?

What causes Hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid)?

Hypothyroidism is the term used to describe the condition that occurs when a persons thyroid is not producing sufficient amounts of the thyroid hormone to meet the body’s needs.

The thyroid hormone is extremely important as it plays an important part in ensuring that your metabolism remains in balance.

The thyroid hormone regulates the rate at which carbohydrates and fats are used by the body. The thyroid hormone also performs other functions such as helping to regulate heart rate, production of proteins and body temperature.

The thyroid gland itself can be found just beneath the Adam’s Apple. The hormones it produces are Thyroxine (T4) and Triiodothyronine (T3).

Hypothyroidism (under active thyroid) most commonly occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the thyroid gland. As a result the thyroid gland becomes damaged which then prevents it from producing enough thyroid hormone (thyroxine) to meet the body’s needs. This of course is not the only way in which someone can begin suffering from hypothyroidism, there are a variety of other causes also.

If the body does not receive sufficient quantities of the thyroid hormone the body’s ability to use energy is severely impaired. The thyroid hormone is also instrumental in helping the body to maintain bones and muscles in a healthy condition.

There is no known way by which you can prevent hypothyroidism nor is there an actual medical cure for the disease. It is generally accepted that once you have hypothyroidism you will have the disease for life.

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is the name given to hypothyroidism that is caused by the thyroid becoming inflamed as a direct result of an attack by the body’s own immune system. This is commonly known as an ‘autoimmune disorder’.

Hypothyroidism caused by Problems with the Thyroid itself.

If you have had a problem with your thyroid that has necessitated having the thyroid surgically removed you will suffer from hypothyroidism as a direct result.

There is also a condition referred to as Congenital Thyroid Agenesis, which describes someone who was born without a thyroid, that will cause the individual to suffer from hypothyroidism.


There are a number of prescription medications that can cause the thyroid gland to deteriorate. This can even occur, in some cases, with some of the drugs that are actually commonly prescribed to hypothyroidism sufferers to relieve their condition.

Generic Defects

Hypothyroidism can also be caused as a result of a genetic defect of some sort. If the genes that are responsible for regulating the thyroid hormone have been damaged it is likely that the individual will contract hypothyroidism.

The majority of these gene defects are detected at a very early age.

Pituitary Problems

It is possible, although not common, for hypothyroidism to be caused by a malfunction of the Pituitary Gland.

The Pituitary Gland produces a hormone itself that is responsible for stimulating the thyroid into producing the thyroid hormone. Without this stimulation the thyroid gland simply does no perform properly.

Although the medical profession seem to have resigned themselves to the fact that an under active thyroid cannot be cured there are natural treatments that have been proven to be extremely effective. If you adopt a proper hypothyroidism diet it is possible to control the disease to the point that you can lead a normal life. There is also a hypothyroid treatment called The Hypothyroidism Diet Revolution that treats the entire hormone pathway which has had a phenomenal amount of success.

Overview of Thyroid Disorders

In America there are in excess of 15 million people who are currently affected by some form of thyroid disorder. Regrettably most of these people do not know that their ill health is due to a thyroid disorder.

Testing for thyroid malfunctions is a straight forward procedure and only requires a simple blood test. The thyroid is not usually checked as part of a routine examination and it is only included in the examination if the patient asks for it to be done or the doctor suspects that the patients problems might be the result of a thyroid disorder.

Thyroid disorders affect a good deal more women than men. In fact some research shows that if you are a woman you are about eight times more inclined to have thyroid disorders than you would be if you were a man.

Problems relating to the immune system are likely to be the underlying reason for the thyroid ceasing to function. By the age of fifty around 10% of women display symptoms that indicate they might be suffering from some form of thyroid dysfunction. Many sufferers are either diagnosed incorrectly or their symptoms are ignored completely due to their “nonespecific” nature.

In a lot of cases individuals who have thyroid problems are simply diagnosed as having stress or depression or the symptoms are simply attributed to being part of the natural ageing process.

The body relies heavily on the thyroid gland. The pituitary gland is responsible for keeping the thyroid in check by stimulating it into producing hormone.

The thyroid usually malfunctions in one of two ways. It can become underactive which results in it produces insufficient hormone, a condition that is known as hypothyroidism. It can also produce an excessive amount of hormone, a condition known as hyperthyroidism.

Anyone suffering from hypothyroidism will have a slow metabolic rate and someone who suffers from hyperthyroidism (an over active thyroid) has a high metabolic rate.

Medications given to patients with thyroid disorders are merely intended to restore a proper hormonal balance only. They are in no way a cure for the condition. Most doctors maintain that there is no cure for either hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism and tell their patients that they must resign themselves to taking medication indefinitely.

There has however been research carried out that suggests diet can in actual fact influence how the thyroid functions. There are quite a lot of diets for hypothyroidism that have been proven to help people with thyroid disorders to manage their condition.

If you would like to investigate further how changing your eating habits may possibly help to relieve your thyroid problems you might be interested in reading about the hypothyroidism revolution diet and treatment program.
The program has be devised by a former hypothyroidism sufferer who successfully rid himself of the disease and has also had in excess of 17,000 other people who have benefited from the information he provides.
The hypothyroidism diet is completely natural and shows you exactly what foods you should, and should not, be eating.

6 Most Common Thyroid Symptoms Indicating an Underactive Thyroid

In this article we are going to talk about the 6 most common thyroid symptoms so you can decide if you have a thyroid problem. The Thyroid is a butterfly shaped gland in your neck and is vital to many of your bodily systems.

Recent research suggests as many as 59 million Americans have a thyroid problem with the majority of these people not even aware they have a problem.

If you have an undiagnosed thyroid problem it can lead to unexplained weight gain, heart disease, depression, decreased libido, infertility, hair loss, anxiety and so much more. For such a small gland the thyroid is responsible for a heck of a lot.

So to work out if you might have a thyroid problem we are going to look at some the most common symptoms. Do you know if you have a thyroid problem it might stop you losing weight even if you diet and exercise?

We are going to start with weight gain as it is the most common symptom for people with a thyroid disorder.

1. Have You Gained Weight Unexplainably and Cannot Get Rid Of it?

If you have unexplained weight gain or find it hard to lose weight even though you are dieting and exercising it could be due to a thyroid disorder. It is estimated 20 million people in America are overweight and don’t have to be. It is their thyroid stopping them being the weight they want to be.

2. Are You Suffering With Anxiety and Depression

Thyroid disorders and depression are intrinsically linked. If you have depression which isn’t responding to antidepressant medication it might be a sign of a thyroid disorder. When you have low thyroid function you produce less thyroid hormones.

Thyroid hormones are needed for ideal brain function. If your have low levels of thyroid hormone it can affect cognitive function, ability to concentrate, attention span, mood and emotions.

3. Do You Experience Tiredness and Fatigue On A Daily Basis?

If you sleep all night and wake up the next morning feeling exhausted or are unable to function all day without taking a nap it could be a sign of low thyroid function. When you have low thyroid function it can lead to a rapid pulse, high blood pressure and constipation which makes you tired.

4. Have You Noticed Changes In Your Hair and Skin?

When you suffer with low thyroid function you’re hair and skin will most likely be effected. When you have an under active thyroid your hair may become brittle, dry and will break off or fall out more than before.

Your skin may become coarse, thick, dry and scaly too. When you have low thyroid function you may also lose hair on the outer edges of your eyebrow.

5. Are You Suffering With High Cholesterol Which Doesn’t Respond To Diet Changes

If you’re suffering from high cholesterol which doesn’t seem to be responding to changes in diet, lifestyle or the use of cholesterol lowering medication it may be a sign of an underactive thyroid.

6. Have You Experienced Tendonitis, Carpel Tunnel Syndrome, Muscle and/or Joint Pain?

It’s common for people with low thyroid function to suffer with aches and pains in their muscles. Suffers can also experience weakness in their arms and a propensity to get carpel tunnel syndrome in their arms and hands plus tarsal tunnel in their legs.

Are You Suffering For More Than One Of These Underactive Thyroid Symptoms?

If you have an underactive thyroid you may not suffer with all the above symptoms. The chances you have one or two of these symptoms.

If you suffer with low thyroid function you can overcome these symptoms with the right diet and lifestyle changes including losing weight you have gained.

7 Foods to Avoid When You Have Low Thyroid Function

There are foods to avoid when you have low thyroid function because they can interfere with you overcoming the condition. You see there are certain foods which can affect the function of the thyroid gland.

If you know what you can and cannot eat it will make tackling you hypothyroidism a lot easier. So in our article today we are going to looks at foods to avoid when you have low thyroid function.

Fatty Foods

Recent research suggests the fat can interfere with your thyroid gland capacity to produce thyroid hormone. When you’re suffer with low thyroid function you’re ability to produce thyroid hormone has already been reduced so fatty foods will make the problem worse.

Healthcare professionals suggest you cut out all fired food from your diet and lower your intake of fats. Fats come from many sources such as butter, margarine, mayonnaise and fatty cuts of meat.


When you have hyperthyroidism you should look to decrease your intake of gluten. Gluten is a protein found in foods processed from grains such as wheat, barley and rye. Gluten can irritate your small intestine and stop it from absorbing vital thyroid hormone it needs to work properly.

Cruciferous Vegetables

What are cruciferous vegetables I hear you ask? Well cruciferous vegetables are a vegetables from the family Brassicaceae and are widely cultivated. Vegetables such as Brussel sprouts, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and green leafy vegetables are all cruciferous vegetables.

Digesting cruciferous vegetables can block the thyroids’ capacity to absorb iodine. Your thyroid needs to absorb iodine to work properly. If you are going to eat some these vegetables then cooking them first will reduce the effect they will have on your thyroid gland.

Sugary Foods

When you suffer with hypothyroidism it will most likely cause your metabolism to slow down and that’s why many people with low thyroid function gain weight. To avoid putting on more weight it is best to avoid sugary foods as they are “empty calories”, meaning they contain no nutrients. If possible it is best to cut out sugar from your diet completely.


It is well-known estrogen can inhibit with your body’s ability usage of thyroid hormone. The reason is soy is packed with plant-based phytoestrogen which many believe increases a person’s risk to low thyroid function. So it is advised if you have hypothyroidism you keep your soy intake to a minimum.

Processed Foods

Processed foods as a rule have tend to have a lot of sodium in them. If you suffer with hypothyroidism it is advised you avoid sodium. When you have an underactive thyroid you are at greater risk of high blood pressure.

Sodium intake increases your risk of getting high blood pressure. So when you go food shopping remember to read the food labels as they let you know the sodium levels in the food. A good guide is to keep your sodium intake below 1,500 milligrams a day.

Too Much Fiber

Yes fiber is good for you but too much fiber can interfere with your absorption of thyroid hormone. Dietary guidelines suggest the average adult eat 20 to 35 grams of fiber a day from sources such as vegetables, beans, legumes and fruits.

Eating Healthy Will Improve Your Hypothyroidism

If you look at the foods to avoid when you have low thyroid function you’ll see that eating healthy will help improve your hypothyroidism. The most common symptom of hypothyroidism is weight gain.

What Is the Thyroid Gland And How Does It Affect Your Everyday Health?

The thyroid gland is one of the most important endocrine organs of the body. The thyroid is located in the neck just below the thyroid cartilage (in guy’s we call it the Adam’s apple) and cricoid cartilage.

Its size can vary depending on one’s iodine intake. However on average the thyroid gland weighs between 15-20 grams.

It’s made up of two lobes which lie on either side of the windpipe. Each lobe is around the size of small orange slice. The right and left lobes are connected by a thin strip of thyroid tissue called the theisthmus.

In the average person even those will low thyroid function, the lobes are not visible. However they can become enlarged and in some circumstances this is known as “goiter”.

So the thyroid is part of the endocrine system and is responsible for releasing hormones as are all parts of the endocrine system. There is a very subtle balance between the endocrine system and the hormones it produces.

The principal purpose of thyroid hormones is to balance your metabolism.

Your body’s metabolism regulates how quickly your body uses energy you have stored up. When your metabolism is working correctly, everything runs like a well-oiled engine so your body is in harmony.

Your thyroid and its functions impact almost all parts of the body. Here is a list of just some functions affected by the thyroid:

· Concentration

· Functionality of many different types of enzymes

· Your body’s utilization of minerals

· The secretion and breakdown of all other hormones in the body

· All aspects of the metabolism including fats, proteins, carbohydrates and vitamins

· The body’s employment of minerals

· The stimulus of marrow in the bones

· Helps control bone synthesis

· Allows the bones to produce red blood cells when necessary

· The response of tissues to all other hormones

· The strength with which the heart contracts and the rhythm with which it beats

· Lungs and respiration (especially true when tissue/blood oxygen levels fall below optimum levels)

· Cell turnover (vital for long-term health and the prevention of premature aging)

All in all there’s not a tissue in the body which isn’t affected by excess or insufficient amounts of thyroid hormones in the body. For such a small gland it affects the body in astonishingly diverse ways and is crucial to overall wellbeing.

So when it’s out of sync with the rest of your body; it can have a big impact on how you feel on a day-to-day basis. So you need your thyroid to be in optimal working order for you to feel at your best.

Luckily there are some steps you can take to get your thyroid back in shape.

How Can You Improve Your Thyroid Health?

If you know your thyroid isn’t working properly then there are steps you can take to improve your thyroid health and lessen the symptoms of the disorder.

There are certain foods you should avoid and other foods you can eat to help you overcome your condition. For example you should stay away from processed foods, fatty foods and gluten.

3 Signs Your Thyroid Could Be Causing You to Gain Weight and What You Can Do

Your thyroid could be causing you gain weight. 20 million US citizens right now are overweight and don’t need to be. It is because their thyroid isn’t working properly and they don’t even know about it.

The problem is low thyroid function also known as hypothyroidism is hard to diagnose and many people in America have been misdiagnosed. So their thyroid disorder goes untreated and they continue to gain weight and don’t know why.

One of the easiest ways to find out if you have low thyroid function is to see if you suffer from one or more of the common symptoms associated with the condition and take it from there.

So in today’s article we are going to look at three of the most common symptoms people can suffer from when they have hyperthyroidism. The most common symptoms of low thyroid function is weight gain so it seems like a good place to start.

Low Thyroid Function and Weight Gain

The number one symptoms of hypothyroidism is unexplained weight gain. This is when you gain weight when you haven’t made any changes in diet and lifestyle. When you have low thyroid function one of the first issues you will have is your metabolism slows down.

When you metabolism slows down it means you can’t process the calories which are entering your body as quickly as before. This means that some of these calories don’t get burned off and are instead stored as fat in your body and you slowly start to gain more weight.

This is without you eating more and isn’t your fault. It is your thyroid which is to blame and the chances are you don’t have a clue what is going on. Which puts you in the majority because 50% of people with low thyroid function don’t know they have a problem.

So what other symptoms can you suffer from with hypothyroidism?

Depression, Anxiety and Low Thyroid Function

Many people with hypothyroidism suffer with depression and/or anxiety. One reason people often get depressed is because of the unnecessary weight gain we explained above. When people start to put on weight, don’t know why and then can’t lose this weight it can lead to a loss of confidence which in turn may lead to depression.

Thyroid disorders and depression are innately linked and if you have depression which isn’t responding to medication then it could be due to a thyroid disorder. When your thyroid isn’t working properly you produce less thyroid hormones.

Thyroid hormones are needed for you to have optimal brain function. When there are less thyroid hormones in your body it leads to a loss of cognitive function, lack of concentration and big swings in your emotional state.

When your thyroid gland isn’t working well it really can cause havoc to your body including leading to tiredness and fatigue.

Low Thyroid Function, Tiredness and Fatigue

If you go to bed at night and find yourself waking up the next morning feeling truly exhausted and are unable to function properly then it could be a sign your thyroid isn’t functioning well. If you have hypothyroidism it can lead to a quickening of pulse, high blood pressure and constipation which leaves you extremely tired.

So the issue becomes, if you believe you have a thyroid problem what do you do?

What Is The Thyroid, How Does It Become Underactive And How Should It Be Treated?

Underactive thyroid, myxoedema or hypothyroidism affects millions of people, mainly women, in the US. It’s a condition that can’t be prevented but, once diagnosed, it can be successfully controlled by use of daily hormone tablets.

What is the thyroid and how does it become underactive?

The thyroid is a small butterfly shaped gland which sits in the neck just in front of the trachea or windpipe, which produces thyroxine, the hormone which helps to keep the body’s metabolism working at the correct level. If the thyroid is unable to make enough thyroxine, it causes many of the body’s functions to slow down. This can happen as a result of two things, with the most common cause being autoimmune disease (autoimmune thyroiditis), where your antibodies start to attack your thyroid and affect its ability to produce thyroxine. Scientists still don’t know exactly why this happens. The other cause, although less common, is when there is not enough of the thryoid gland left, either as a result of damage or surgery, to make the necessary levels of thyroxine.

How is hypothyroidism treated?

Most people with hypothyroidism are offered replacement hormone treatment, which involves taking a daily dose of the synthetic thyroid hormone, Levothyroxine. This is administered orally and works by restoring thyroxine to its normal level. By doing so, the symptoms associated with an underactive thyroid, such as fatigue, can be quickly reversed.

This method of treatment has rapid results, with most sufferers noticing improved symptoms within one to two weeks, with usually the first noticeable change being an increase in energy levels. The replacement hormone is also able to lower cholesterol levels and, once hormone levels are restored to normal, you’ll probably find that any excess weight gained will start to disappear.

How long will I have to take synthetic hormones?

Unfortunately, while Levothyroxine does have great success in controlling and reversing the symptoms of hypothyroidism, it won’t cure the condition. You’ll need to take your daily pills for the rest of your life, and have annual checks to see whether there are any changes to your thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels which will have an effect on the dosage you receive.

What else can I do?

While there is no evidence to suggest that hypothyroidism can be controlled or reversed by diet, making sure that you eat a wide variety of nutritious foods can help to prevent you from developing diseases often associated with undiagnosed hypothyroidism. This includes foods which contain iodine, folic acid and selenium, plus those which contain high levels of B vitamins, such as whole grains, nuts and seeds.

Common Underactive Thyroid (Hypothyroidism) Symptoms

As many as 27 million Americans suffer from problems with their thyroid, with about 1 in 50 women and 1 in 1000 men developing hypothyroidism (the most common thyroid condition) at some point in their lives. Although children can be born with congenital hypothyroidism, it generally develops in adulthood and becomes more common as we age. It’s usually caused by an autoimmune response known as autoimmune thyroiditis or Hashimoto’s disease or by some kind of damage to the thyroid gland itself.

The thyroid and hypothyroidism

The thyroid is a small gland, shaped rather like a butterfly, which is located in the neck just in front of the windpipe. Hypothyroidism is the term used to describe the condition which occurs when the amount of thyroid hormone (thyroxin) produced by the thyroid is reduced. Unfortunately the condition can’t be prevented, but luckily it’s easily treated by taking daily hormone tablets (levothyroxine) to replace the missing thyroxine, and most sufferers feel an improvement in their symptoms very quickly after starting treatment.

How do you know if you’re suffering from hypothyroidism?

If you have a low level of thyroxine in your body you’ll experience a range of physical and mental symptoms, which usually develop slowly and gradually worsen over a long period of time as the level of thyroxine continues to fall. These are some of the most common symptoms, although you may not develop all of these at the same time.

  • Tiredness – you may start to feel more tired than usual despite keeping to the same pattern of activity
  • Sensitivity to the cold
  • Unexplained weight gain
  • Fluid retention
  • Constipation
  • Depression
  • A feeling of lethargy – with slow movements and thoughts
  • Aches and weakness of the muscles, possibly combined with muscle cramps
  • Dry and scaly skin
  • Thin and lifeless hair and nails

Other less common symptoms include:

  • Memory loss or confusion (this is common,especially among elderly sufferers)
  • A hoarse voice
  • Irregular or heavy periods
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Infertility
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome

Children with hypothyroidism may experience slower growth and development, while teenagers may begin puberty earlier than normal. Of course, all these symptoms can be due to other conditions, making an accurate diagnosis more difficult. However, if you suspect you, or someone close to you, may have an underactive thyroid you should always consult your physician for a full diagnosis. It is desirable to do this as early as possible following the notice of any of the symptoms listed above.